Character functions and properties

Character.AddInventory

(Formerly known as global function AddInventory, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as global function AddInventoryToCharacter, which is now obsolete)

Character.AddInventory(InventoryItem *item, optional int addAtIndex)

Adds the specified item to the character's inventory. This ensures that the item gets added to the character's inventory list, and that any on-screen inventory display gets updated if appropriate.

The first parameter is the inventory item's Script O-Name from the editor (for example, iPoster).

By default, the new item is added to the end of the character's inventory list. However, you can insert it in a particular position in the list by supplying the second parameter. The new item is inserted before the current item at addAtIndex. Indexes are numbered from 0, so to add the item at the start of the list, pass 0 as the second parameter.

Example:

cEgo.AddInventory(iKey);

will give inventory item iKey to character EGO.

See Also: Character.HasInventory, Character.LoseInventory, UpdateInventory


Character.AddWaypoint

(Formerly known as MoveCharacterPath, which is now obsolete)

Character.AddWaypoint(int x, int y)

Tells the character to move to (X,Y) directly, after it has finished its current move. This function allows you to queue up a series of moves for the character to make, if you want them to take a preset path around the screen. Note that any moves made with this command ignore walkable areas.

This is useful for situations when you might want a townsperson to wander onto the screen from one side, take a preset route around it and leave again.

Example:

cSomeguy.Walk(160, 100);
cSomeguy.AddWaypoint(50, 150);
cSomeguy.AddWaypoint(50, 50);

tells character SOMEGUY to first of all walk to the center of the screen normally (obeying walkable areas), then move to the bottom left corner and then top left corner afterwards.

See Also: Character.Move Character.Walk


Character.Animate

(Formerly known as AnimateCharacter, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as AnimateCharacterEx, which is now obsolete)

Character.Animate(int loop, int delay, optional RepeatStyle,
                  optional BlockingStyle, optional Direction, optional int frame)

Starts the character animating, using loop number LOOP of his current view and optionally starting at FRAME. The overall speed of the animation is set with DELAY, where 0 is the fastest, and increasing numbers mean slower. The delay for each frame is worked out as DELAY + FRAME SPD, so the individual frame speeds are relative to this overall speed.

Before using this command, you should use LockView in order to select the view you want to animate with and prevent any automatic animations (eg. walking or idle animations) from playing.

The RepeatStyle parameter sets whether the animation will continuously repeat the cycling through the frames. This can be eOnce (or zero), in which case the animation will start from the first frame of LOOP, and go through each frame in turn until the last frame, where it will stop. If RepeatStyle is eRepeat (or 1), then when the last frame is reached, it will go back to the first frame and start over again with the animation.

For blocking you can pass either eBlock (in which case the function will wait for the animation to finish before returning), or eNoBlock (in which case the animation will start to play, but your script will continue). The default is eBlock.

Direction specifies which way the animation plays. You can either pass eForwards (the default) or eBackwards.

Frame lets you specify the starting frame, which should be one of the chosen loop's frame.
Note that for compatibility reasons if direction is eBackwards the animation actually begins with the previous frame. If you pass frame 0 (the default) then it will begin with the last frame in the loop.

If the character is currently moving, it will be stopped.

Example:

cEgo.LockView(5);
cEgo.Animate(3, 1, 0, eBlock, eBackwards);
cEgo.UnlockView();

will animate the character once using loop number 3 of view 5 backwards, and wait until the animation finishes before returning.

Compatibility: Optional frame parameter is supported only by AGS 3.5.0 and later versions.

See Also: Button.Animate, Object.Animate


Character.ChangeRoom

(Formerly known as NewRoom, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as NewRoomEx, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as NewRoomNPC, which is now obsolete)

Character.ChangeRoom(int room_number, optional int x, optional int y, optional CharacterDirection direction)

Changes the room that the character is in.

If you call this on the player character, then the game will move into the new room with them.

IMPORTANT: This command does not change the room immediately; instead, it will perform the actual room change once your script function has finished (This is to avoid problems with unloading the script while it is still running). This means that you should not use any other commands which rely on the new room (object positionings, and so on) after this command within the same function.

If you call this on a non-player character, then they are instantly transported to the new room number.

Optionally, you can include an X and Y co-ordinate (you must include either both or neither). If you do so, then the character will also be moved to the specified co-ordinates in the new room.

Optionally, you can also include direction parameter, that determines which direction this character will be facing after room change.

Example:

player.ChangeRoom(4, 100, 50, eDirectionRight);

will move the player character to room 4 and also place him at coordinates 100,50. This will also mean that the game moves into room 4.

Compatibility: Optional direction parameter is supported only by AGS 3.4.0 and later versions.

See Also: Character.ChangeRoomAutoPosition


Character.ChangeRoomAutoPosition

Character.ChangeRoomAutoPosition(int room_number, optional int newPosition)

Changes the room that the character is in, and positions him along one of the room edges.

This command simulates the behavior of the old "Go to room" interaction command from AGS 2.72 and previous versions. If newPosition is not specified or is 0, the character will be placed on the opposite side of the new room, if he is within 10 pixels of a room edge in the current room.

Alternatively, you can specify the position where he will get placed in the new room. newPosition can be 1000 for the left edge, 2000 for the right edge, 3000 for the bottom edge and 4000 for the top edge. Then, add on the offset within that edge where you want to place the character, in normal room co-ordinates.

IMPORTANT: This command does not change the room immediately; instead, it will perform the actual room change once your script function has finished (This is to avoid problems with unloading the script while it is still running). This means that you should not use any other commands which rely on the new room (object positionings, and so on) after this command within the same function.

NOTE: This command can only be used with the player character.

Example:

player.ChangeRoomAutoPosition(4, 2100);

will move the player character to room 4 and place him half way down the right hand side of the screen. This will also mean that the game moves into room 4.

See Also: Character.ChangeRoom


Character.ChangeView

(Formerly known as ChangeCharacterView, which is now obsolete)

Character.ChangeView(int view)

Changes the normal view number of the character to view. This is useful if, for example, you want the character to change the clothes they are wearing, and so permanently alter their view number.

NOTE: This command is not intended to change the view temporarily to perform an animation. If you want to do that, use the LockView command instead. This ChangeView command permanently changes the character's normal walking view.

Example:

cEgo.ChangeView(5);

will make the EGO character use view number 5 as his walking view.

See Also: Character.LockView, Character.NormalView


Character.FaceCharacter

(Formerly known as global function FaceCharacter, which is now obsolete)

Character.FaceCharacter(Character* toFace, optional BlockingStyle)

Turns the graphic of the character so that it looks like he is facing character TOFACE. This involves changing the current loop to the appropriate loop number, and setting the frame number to 0 (standing).

If the character has Turning enabled (i.e. the "Characters turn to face direction" game option is turned on, and the character does not have the "Do not turn before walking" option checked), then the character will turn on the spot in order to face the new direction. In this case, the BlockingStyle parameter determines whether the script waits for the character to finish turning (eBlock, the default) or whether the script continues immediately and the character finishes turning later on (eNoBlock).

If the character does not have Turning enabled, he will immediately turn to face the new direction and the BlockingStyle parameter has no effect. In this case, the screen will not be refreshed straight away -- if you want to see the character facing his new direction immediately, call Wait(1);

Example:

cEgo.FaceCharacter(cMan);

will make the character EGO face the character MAN

See Also: Character.FaceDirection, Character.FaceLocation, Character.FaceObject, Character.Walk


Character.FaceDirection

Character.FaceDirection(CharacterDirection direction, BlockingStyle=eBlock)

Turns the graphic of the character so that it looks like he is facing direction direction. This involves changing the current loop to the appropriate loop number, and setting the frame number to 0 (standing).

If the character has Turning enabled (i.e. the "Characters turn to face direction" game option is turned on, and the character does not have the "Do not turn before walking" option checked), then the character will turn on the spot in order to face the new direction. In this case, the BlockingStyle parameter determines whether the script waits for the character to finish turning (eBlock, the default) or whether the script continues immediately and the character finishes turning later on (eNoBlock).

If the character does not have Turning enabled, he will immediately turn to face the new direction and the BlockingStyle parameter has no effect. In this case, the screen will not be refreshed straight away -- if you want to see the character facing his new direction immediately, call Wait(1);

Example:

cEgo.FaceDirection(eDirectionUpRight);

will make the character EGO face up-right.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.0 and later versions.

See Also: Character.FaceCharacter, Character.FaceLocation, Character.FaceObject, Character.Walk


Character.FaceLocation

(Formerly known as global function FaceLocation, which is now obsolete)

Character.FaceLocation(int x, int y, optional BlockingStyle)

Similar to the FaceCharacter function, except that this faces the character to room co-ordinates (X,Y). This allows him to face not only other characters, but also hotspots or anything else as well (you can get co-ordinates by watching the co-ordinates displayed in the Room Settings mode as you move the mouse over the room background).

If the character has Turning enabled (i.e. the "Characters turn to face direction" game option is turned on, and the character does not have the "Do not turn before walking" option checked), then the character will turn on the spot in order to face the new direction. In this case, the BlockingStyle parameter determines whether the script waits for the character to finish turning (eBlock, the default) or whether the script continues immediately and the character finishes turning later on (eNoBlock).

If the character does not have Turning enabled, he will immediately turn to face the new direction and the BlockingStyle parameter has no effect. In this case, the screen will not be refreshed straight away -- if you want to see the character facing his new direction immediately, call Wait(1);

Example:

cEgo.FaceLocation(cEgo.x + 50, cEgo.y);

will make the character face to the east.

See Also: Character.FaceCharacter, Character.FaceDirection, Character.FaceObject, Character.Walk


Character.FaceObject

Character.FaceObject(Object* object, optional BlockingStyle)

Similar to the FaceCharacter function, except that this faces the character to object OBJECT in the current room.

If the character has Turning enabled (i.e. the "Characters turn to face direction" game option is turned on, and the character does not have the "Do not turn before walking" option checked), then the character will turn on the spot in order to face the new direction. In this case, the BlockingStyle parameter determines whether the script waits for the character to finish turning (eBlock, the default) or whether the script continues immediately and the character finishes turning later on (eNoBlock).

If the character does not have Turning enabled, he will immediately turn to face the new direction and the BlockingStyle parameter has no effect. In this case, the screen will not be refreshed straight away -- if you want to see the character facing his new direction immediately, call Wait(1);

Example:

player.FaceObject(object[2]);

will make the player character face object 2.

See Also: Character.FaceCharacter, Character.FaceDirection, Character.FaceLocation, Character.Walk


Character.FollowCharacter

(Formerly known as global function FollowCharacter, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as global function FollowCharacterEx, which is now obsolete)

Character.FollowCharacter(Character* chartofollow, optional int dist,
                          optional int eagerness)

Tells the character to follow CHARTOFOLLOW around, wherever he goes. You could use this command to have a group of main characters who go around together, or for example when the hero has rescued someone from the bad guy, they can follow the hero home.

Pass CHARTOFOLLOW as null to stop the character following.

There are a couple of extra optional parameters:

DIST sets how far away from CHARTOFOLLOW that CHARID will stand. If DIST is 1, they will try to stand very close; if DIST is for example 20, they will stand about 20 pixels away.

EAGERNESS sets on average how long the character will stand around before checking if he needs to move again. Setting this to 0 means that he will always be on the move until he reaches CHARTOFOLLOW; setting this to 99 means that he will pause and think for a while on route. Values in between specify different lengths of idle time.

The default values are DIST=10 and EAGERNESS=97.

As a special case, setting DIST=0 and EAGERNESS=0 makes CHARID behave as if it is chasing CHARTOFOLLOW - it will try and get there as quickly as possible. Setting EAGERNESS=0 also tells the character not to stop when they reach CHARTOFOLLOW, but instead to randomly wander around the character - useful perhaps for a very energetic dog or something.

There is also another special use for this command. You can pass the special value FOLLOW_EXACTLY as the DIST parameter rather than passing a number. If you do this, then CHARID will always remain at exactly the same X and Y co-ordinates as CHARTOFOLLOW. This might be useful for effects such as a temporary halo over the character and so forth.

If you use FOLLOW_EXACTLY, then EAGERNESS has another meaning. If you pass 0, CHARID will be drawn in front of CHARTOFOLLOW; if you pass 1, it will be drawn behind.

When the character being followed changes room, the character following will change to the same room and position after a number of frames defined on game.following_room_timer.

Example:

cMan.FollowCharacter(cEgo, 5, 80);

will make character MAN follow character EGO standing about 5 pixels near him and waiting for a while before he makes his move.

See Also: game.following_room_timer


Character.GetAtRoomXY

static Character* Character.GetAtRoomXY(int x, int y)

Checks if there is a character at ROOM co-ordinates (X,Y). Returns the character if there is, or null if there is not.

NOTE: Any characters with the "Clickable" property set to false will not be seen by this function.

Example:

Character* target = Character.GetAtRoomXY(oBullet.x, oBullet.y);
if (target != null) {
  Display("Character %s is hit by a bullet", target.Name);
}

will display the message if the room object oBullet is over any character.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.5.0 and later versions.

See Also: Character.GetAtScreenXY, Hotspot.GetAtRoomXY, Object.GetAtRoomXY, Region.GetAtRoomXY, Game.GetLocationName


Character.GetAtScreenXY

(Formerly known as global function GetCharacterAt, which is now obsolete)

static Character* Character.GetAtScreenXY(int x, int y)

Checks if there is a character at SCREEN co-ordinates (X,Y). Returns the character if there is, or null if there is not. See the description of GetLocationName for more on screen co-ordinates.

NOTE: Any characters with the "Clickable" property set to false will not be seen by this function.

Example:

if (Character.GetAtScreenXY(mouse.x, mouse.y) == cEgo) {
  Display("The mouse is over the main character");
}

will display the message if the mouse cursor is over the EGO character

See Also: Character.GetAtRoomXY, Hotspot.GetAtScreenXY, Object.GetAtScreenXY, Region.GetAtScreenXY, Game.GetLocationName


Character.GetProperty

(Formerly known as GetCharacterProperty, which is now obsolete)

Character.GetProperty(string property)

Returns the custom property setting of the PROPERTY for the specified character.

This command works with Number properties (it returns the number), and with Boolean properties (returns 1 if the box was checked, 0 if not).

Use the equivalent GetTextProperty function to get a text property.

Example:

if (cEgo.GetProperty("Value") > 200)
  Display("EGO's value is over 200!");

will print the message if EGO has its "Value" property set to more than 200.

See Also: Character.GetTextProperty


Character.GetTextProperty

(Formerly known as GetCharacterPropertyText, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as Character.GetPropertyText, which is now obsolete)

String Character.GetTextProperty(string property)

Returns the custom property setting of the PROPERTY for the specified character.

This command works with Text properties only. The property's text will be returned from this function.

Use the equivalent GetProperty function to get a non-text property.

Example:

String description = cEgo.GetTextProperty("Description");
Display("EGO's description: %s", description);

will retrieve EGO's "description" property and display it.

See Also: Character.GetProperty


Character.SetProperty

bool Character.SetProperty(const string property, int value)

Sets the new value for the custom property for the specified character. Returns TRUE if such property exists and FALSE on failure.

This command works with Number properties (it sets the numeric value), and with Boolean properties (sets FALSE is value is equal to 0, or TRUE otherwise).

Use the equivalent SetTextProperty function to set new text property value.

Example:

cEgo.SetProperty("XPLevel", 10);

will change EGO character's "XPLevel" custom property to 10.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.0 and later versions.

See Also: Character.SetTextProperty


Character.SetTextProperty

bool Character.SetTextProperty(const string property, const string value)

Sets the new value text for the custom property for the specified character. Returns TRUE if such property exists and FALSE on failure.

This command works with Text properties only. The property's text will be changed to new value.

Use the equivalent SetProperty function to set a non-text property.

Example:

cEgo.SetTextProperty("Description", "I am handsome!");

will change EGO's "description" property.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.0 and later versions.

See Also: Character.SetProperty


Character.HasExplicitLight

readonly bool Character.HasExplicitTint

Returns true if the character has a light set explicitly with the Character.SetLightLevel command.

Returns false if the character has no explicit light level, but it may still be lighted by SetAmbientLightLevel or a region light.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

SeeAlso: Character.SetLightLevel


Character.HasInventory

bool Character.HasInventory(InventoryItem *item)

Checks whether the character currently has the specified inventory item. Returns true if they do, or false if they don't.

The parameter is the inventory item's Script O-Name from the editor (for example, iPoster).

Example:

if (player.HasInventory(iKey))
{
  Display("The player has the key!!");
}

will display a message if the player has the key.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.1.0 and later versions.

See Also: Character.AddInventory, Character.InventoryQuantity, Character.LoseInventory


Character.IsCollidingWithChar

(Formerly known as AreCharactersColliding, which is now obsolete)

Character.IsCollidingWithChar(Character* otherChar)

Checks if the character is touching OTHERCHAR. This function just checks the baseline of both characters, so if one is standing a fair distance behind the other, it will not be marked as colliding.

Returns 1 if the characters feet are touching, 0 otherwise.

Example:

if (cEgo.IsCollidingWithChar(cMan) == 1)
   { colliding code here }

will execute the colliding code only if the characters EGO and MAN are colliding.

See Also: Character.IsCollidingWithObject, Object.IsCollidingWithObject, AreThingsOverlapping


Character.IsCollidingWithObject

(Formerly known as AreCharObjColliding, which is now obsolete)

Character.IsCollidingWithObject(Object* obj)

Checks whether the character's feet (i.e. the bottom third of the character) are touching OBJ. This can be used to determine if the character is standing on the object.

Returns 1 if they are, and 0 if they are not.

Example:

if (cEgo.IsCollidingWithObject(object[3]) == 1) {
  // colliding code here
}

will execute the colliding code only if the character EGO and the object number 3 are colliding.

See Also: Character.IsCollidingWithChar, Object.IsCollidingWithObject, AreThingsOverlapping


Character.LightLevel

readonly int Character.LightLevel

If the character has an individual light set explicitly with the Character.SetLightLevel command, this property returns the light level value. Otherwise it returns 0.

NOTE: without individual light level set, Character.LightLevel returns 0 even if the character is affected by the ambient or region's light.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

SeeAlso: Character.SetLightLevel, SetAmbientLightLevel


Character.LockView

(Formerly known as SetCharacterView, which is now obsolete)

Character.LockView(int view, optional StopMovementStyle)

Sets the character's view to VIEW. This can be used to perform animations with characters, for example bending down to pick something up, which don't use the default view.

StopMovementStyle determines what to do if character was moving when this function is called. You can pass either eStopMoving (in which case the walking character will stop), or eKeepMoving (in which case the character will keep moving). The default is eStopMoving.

NOTE: This function locks the character's view to the specified view, so that it can only be changed by other script commands (i.e. it won't automatically be changed by AGS on walkable areas, screen changes, etc). When you are done with the animation, call UnlockView to allow AGS to take control back.

Example:

cEgo.LockView(12);
cEgo.Animate(0, 0, eOnce, eBlock, eForwards);
cEgo.UnlockView();

will change the character's EGO view to view 12, perform an animation using loop 0, wait until the animation finishes and then return the character to his normal view.

Compatibility: Optional StopMovementStyle parameter is supported only by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

See Also: Character.Animate, Character.ChangeView, Character.SpeechView, Character.LockViewAligned, Character.LockViewOffset Character.UnlockView,


Character.LockViewAligned

(Formerly known as SetCharacterViewEx, which is now obsolete)

Character.LockViewAligned(int view, int loop, Alignment, optional StopMovementStyle)

Sets the character's view to VIEW, and sets the character's current frame to the first frame in LOOP of VIEW.

The main purpose of this command is that it can align the new frame to the previous one. This is particularly useful if you want to go from the character's normal walking view to a specific animation - since characters have the central point as their 'axis', if you have a wider animation then it can be difficult to stop yourself getting a jumping effect when the animation starts.

Alignment can have one of the following values:

align description
eAlignLeft Moves the new frame so that the left hand side is at exactly the same X co-ordinate as the old one was.
eAlignCentre Leaves the frames centered in the middle.
This is the default and using this is equivalent to just calling LockView.
eAlignRight Moves the new frame so that the right hand side is at exactly the same X co-ordinate as the old one was.

Note that this only aligns the first frame of the animation, so to get the full benefit all your frames in the animation loop should be the same width. All following frames will be shifted by the same amount, until UnlockView is called.

StopMovementStyle determines what to do if character was moving when this function is called. You can pass either eStopMoving (in which case the walking character will stop), or eKeepMoving (in which case the character will keep moving). The default is eStopMoving.

NOTE: This function locks the character's view to the specified view, so that it can only be changed by other script commands (i.e. it won't automatically be changed by the program on regions, screen changes, etc). When you are done with the animation, call UnlockView to allow the program to take control back.

Example:

cEgo.LockViewAligned(12, 1, eAlignLeft);
cEgo.Animate(1, 5, eOnce, eBlock, eForwards);
cEgo.UnlockView();

will change the character's EGO view to view 12, perform an animation using loop 1, wait until the animation finishes and then return the character to his normal view.

Compatibility: Optional StopMovementStyle parameter is supported only by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

See Also: Character.LockView, Character.LockViewOffset, Character.UnlockView


Character.LockViewFrame

(Formerly known as SetCharacterFrame, which is now obsolete)

Character.LockViewFrame(int view, int loop, int frame, optional StopMovementStyle)

Sets the character's graphic to frame FRAME of loop LOOP of view number VIEW. This is useful if you don't want an animation, but just want to change the character to display a specific frame.

The frame will be locked to the one you specify until you call UnlockView.

StopMovementStyle determines what to do if character was moving when this function is called. You can pass either eStopMoving (in which case the walking character will stop), or eKeepMoving (in which case the character will keep moving). The default is eStopMoving.

Example:

cEgo.LockViewFrame(AGHAST, 2, 4);
Wait(40);
cEgo.UnlockView();

will change EGO to have frame 4 of loop 2 in the AGHAST view, wait for a second, then return him to normal.

Compatibility: Optional StopMovementStyle parameter is supported only by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

See Also: Character.Animate, Character.LockView, Character.UnlockView


Character.LockViewOffset

(Formerly known as SetCharacterViewOffset, which is now obsolete)

Character.LockViewOffset(int view, int xOffset, int yOffset, optional StopMovementStyle)

Sets the character's view to VIEW, in the same way as LockView does. However, it also adds a specified offset to all the character's frames until UnlockView is called.

The XOFFSET and YOFFSET parameters specify in actual game resolution units how much to move the character's sprite. Positive values for X move right, for Y move down; negative values do the opposite.

This command is designed to allow you to cope with those niggly situations where animations don't quite line up with the standing frame, assuming all the frames of the animation are the same size. Note that LockViewAligned is easier to use if your frames will align at the left or right hand side.

StopMovementStyle determines what to do if character was moving when this function is called. You can pass either eStopMoving (in which case the walking character will stop), or eKeepMoving (in which case the character will keep moving). The default is eStopMoving.

NOTE: You should only use this command for minor adjustments, since the offsets do not affect the clickable area of the character, what walkable area he is in, and so forth. You should limit the use of this command to in-game cutscenes where the player has no control.

NOTE: This function locks the character's view to the specified view, so that it can only be changed by other script commands (i.e. it won't automatically be changed by AGS on walkable areas, screen changes, etc). When you are done with the animation, call UnlockView to allow AGS to take control back.

Example:

cEgo.LockViewOffset(12, 1, -1);
cEgo.Animate(1, 5, eOnce, eBlock, eForwards);
cEgo.UnlockView();

will change EGO's view to view 12 and animate using loop 1, meanwhile all frames will be shifted 1 pixel right and 1 pixel up.

Compatibility: Optional StopMovementStyle parameter is supported only by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

See Also: Character.LockView, Character.LockViewAligned, Character.UnlockView


Character.LoseInventory

(Formerly known as global function LoseInventory, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as LoseInventoryFromCharacter, which is now obsolete)

Character.LoseInventory(InventoryItem *item)

Removes the specified inventory item from the character's inventory. If they do not have the item, nothing happens.

The parameter is the inventory item's Script O-Name from the editor.

Example:

cEgo.LoseInventory(iKey);

will make the character EGO lose the inventory item iKey from the inventory tab

See Also: Character.AddInventory


Character.Move

Character.Move(int x, int y, optional BlockingStyle,
                             optional WalkWhere);

Starts the character moving from its current location to (X,Y), but does not play the character's walking animation.

The parameters to this command are identical to the Character.Walk command -- see that page for more details. The only difference is that Walk plays the walking animation whereas Move does not.

In the vast majority of cases, you will use Character.Walk instead.

Example:

cEgo.Move(155, 122, eBlock);

will make the character move to 155,122 without playing his walking animation. The script will not continue until the character has reached his destination.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.1.0 and later versions.

See Also: Character.AddWaypoint, Character.FaceCharacter, Character.Walk, MoveCharacterToObject, Object.Move, Character.StopMoving


Character.PlaceOnWalkableArea

(Formerly known as MoveToWalkableArea, which is now obsolete)

Character.PlaceOnWalkableArea()

Places the character in the nearest walkable area to its current location. If the character is already on a walkable area, nothing happens.

This is useful for example in the Player Enters Room event of a room, to make sure the character can move if a ChangeRoom with co-ordinates has been issued to get there. You could also use this in on_event for eEventEnterRoomBeforeFadein to use whenever a player enters a room.

Example:

cEgo.x = Random(320);
cEgo.y = Random(200);
cEgo.PlaceOnWalkableArea();

will move character EGO to a random position but make sure that he is on a walkable area.


Character.RemoveTint

Character.RemoveTint()

Undoes the effects of calling Tint, and returns the character to using the room's ambient tint.

Example:

player.Tint(0, 250, 0, 30, 100);
Wait(40);
player.RemoveTint();

will tint the player character green for a second, then turn it back to normal.

See Also: Character.HasExplicitTint, Character.Tint


Character.IsInteractionAvailable

Character.IsInteractionAvailable(CursorMode)

Checks whether there is an event handler defined for activating the character in cursor mode MODE.

This function is very similar to RunInteraction, except that rather than run the event handler script function, it simply returns true if something would have happened, or false if unhandled_event would have been run.

Example:

if (cNPC.IsInteractionAvailable(eModeTalkto) == 0)
  Display("speaking with this character would not do anything.");

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.0 and later versions.

See Also: IsInteractionAvailable, Character.RunInteraction


Character.RunInteraction

(Formerly known as RunCharacterInteraction, which is now obsolete)

Character.RunInteraction(CursorMode)

Fires the event script as if the player had clicked the mouse on the character in the specified cursor mode. This is one of the mouse cursor modes, as defined in your Cursors tab in the editor.

Example:

cMan.RunInteraction(eModeTalk);

will execute the code defined in the MAN's "TALK TO CHARACTER" event.

See Also: Room.ProcessClick, Character.IsInteractionAvailable, Hotspot.RunInteraction, InventoryItem.RunInteraction


Character.Say

(Formerly known as DisplaySpeech, which is now obsolete)

Character.Say(string message)

Displays the text MESSAGE as speech above the character's head. The text will remain on screen for a limited time, and the user may or may not be able to click it away depending on the setting of "Player can't skip speech text". The text displayed by this function looks identical to that used by the dialog system.

You can insert the value of variables into the message. For more information, see the string formatting section.

Example:

cEgo.Say("My name is ego");

will display the message above the character's EGO head like the LEC games, whilst playing the character's talking animation.

See Also: Display, Character.SayAt, Character.SayBackground, Character.Think


Character.SayAt

(Formerly known as DisplaySpeechAt, which is now obsolete)

SayAt(int x, int y, int width, string message)

Similar to Say, except that the text is displayed with its top left corner at (X,Y), in an area WIDTH wide.

You can use this function to write the character's speech text anywhere you like, and AGS will still play the character's talking animation and so on if appropriate.

NOTE: This function does not support Whole-Screen speech.

Example:

cEgo.SayAt(220, 20, 100, "My name is ego");

will display the message in the top right corner of the screen, whilst playing the character's talking animation.

See Also: Character.Say, Character.SayBackground


Character.SayBackground

(Formerly known as DisplaySpeechBackground, which is now obsolete)

Overlay* Character.SayBackground(string message)

Similar to Say, except that this function returns immediately and the game continues while the character is talking. This allows you to have characters talking in the background while the player does other things. Note that the character's talking animation is not played if this function is used.

This command works by creating a text overlay with an automatic removal time delay. The overlay is returned by this command, so you can save it for use later with Overlay.IsValid and Overlay.Remove, if you want to remove the text prematurely.

If background speech is already on-screen for the character, it will be removed and replaced with the new MESSAGE.

All background speech is automatically removed when a normal Say command is used (unless you set the global variable game.bgspeech_stay_on_display to 1).

Example:

cMan.SayBackground("Hey, why won't you talk to me?");

will display the message above character MAN's head without pausing the game.

See Also: Character.Say


Character.SetAsPlayer

(Formerly known as SetPlayerCharacter, which is now obsolete)

Character.SetAsPlayer()

Changes the character which the player controls to the specified character. This function will also cause the room to change to the room which the chosen character is currently in (though as with ChangeRoom, the change won't happen until the end of the script).

Additionally, calling this command will cause the "player" variable to be updated to point to the specified character.

Example:

cMan.SetAsPlayer();

will change the character that the player controls to character MAN and also change to the room that MAN is in, if he is not in the current room.

See Also: Character.ID, Character.ChangeRoom


Character.SetLightLevel

void Character.SetLightLevel(int light_level)

Sets individual light level for this character.

The light level is from -100 to 100.

In 8-bit games you cannot use positive light level for brightening effect, but you may still use negative values to produce darkening effect.

To disable character lighting and tinting effects, call RemoveTint.

NOTE: Setting a light level will disable any RGB tint set for the character.

NOTE: Character's individual light level OVERRIDES both ambient light level and local region light level.

Example:

cEgo.SetLightLevel(100);

This will give character EGO maximal individual brightness.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.0 and later versions.

See Also: Character.Tint, SetAmbientLightLevel, Object.SetLightLevel, Region.LightLevel


Character.SetIdleView

(Formerly known as SetCharacterIdle, which is now obsolete)

Character.SetIdleView(int idleview, int delay)

Changes the character's idle view to IDLEVIEW, with a timeout of DELAY seconds of inactivity before it is played. Inactivity is defined as when the character is not moving and not being animated.

Setting DELAY to 0 causes the idle view to be looped continuously when the character is not moving - this is useful when for example the character is swimming and they need to tread water when idle.

Pass IDLEVIEW as -1 to disable the idle view completely.

NOTE: The DELAY is actually relative to the game speed. Setting this to 1 means a one second delay at the default 40 fps, but if you have adjusted the game speed then the delay will be adjusted accordingly.

NOTE: Due to a quirk in AGS, you cannot set the Idle View to view 1. In the unlikely event that you created your idle view in View 1, you'll need to move it to another view number.

Example:

cEgo.SetIdleView(12, 30);

will change/set the character EGO's idle view to 12. The idle view will be played if the character is idle for 30 seconds.


Character.SetWalkSpeed

(Formerly known as SetCharacterSpeed, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as SetCharacterSpeedEx, which is now obsolete)

Character.SetWalkSpeed(int x_speed, int y_speed)

Changes the character to have a walking speed of X_SPEED in the horizontal direction and Y_SPEED in the vertical direction. The values used for X_SPEED and Y_SPEED are identical to those set in the AGS Editor for walking speed.

X_SPEED and Y_SPEED can be identical, in which case the character moves with the same speed in any direction. (the editor calls this "Uniform movement speed")

NOTE: This function CANNOT be called while the character is moving, so you must stop him first.

Example:

cEgo.SetWalkSpeed(10, 10);

will change the character EGO's speed to 10.

See Also: Character.AnimationSpeed, Character.StopMoving, Character.Walk, Character.WalkSpeedX, Character.WalkSpeedY


Character.StopMoving

(Formerly known as global function StopMoving, which is now obsolete)

Character.StopMoving()

Stops the character moving and sets its graphic to the standing frame of the current loop.

Example:

if (cEgo.x > 299)
{
  cEgo.StopMoving();
}

will stop the character when he reaches the coordinate x=300.

See Also: Character.Walk, Object.StopMoving


Character.Think

(Formerly known as DisplayThought, which is now obsolete)

Character.Think(string message, ...)

Displays the text MESSAGE as a thought above the specified character's head. The text will remain on screen for a limited time, and the user may or may not be able to click it away depending on the setting of "Player can't skip speech text".

How this function displays the text depends on a few things: the Speech Style setting, the 'Thought uses bubble GUI' setting, and whether the character has a thinking animation or not.

If the "Thought uses bubble GUI" setting is not checked, then the thought will be displayed in the same way as normal speech - the difference being that the character's thinking animation will play (or no animation if they don't have one).

If you are using Sierra-style speech and the character doesn't have a thinking animation, the thought bubble will be displayed in LucasArts-style.

If the "Thought uses bubble GUI" setting has been set, then the thought will be displayed like normal speech, except that the bubble GUI will be used for the window background. In LucasArts-style speech this means above the character's head, in Sierra-style it will be done along the top of the screen as normal.

If the character has a thinking animation, it will just loop through once (it won't repeat).

You can insert the value of variables into the message. For more information, see the string formatting section.

Example:

cEgo.Think("I wonder what's for dinner.");

will display the message above EGO's head and play the character's thinking animation.

See Also: Character.BlinkWhileThinking, Character.Say, Character.Thinking, Character.ThinkingFrame, Character.ThinkView, game.speech_bubble_width


Character.Tint

Character.Tint(int red, int green, int blue,
               int saturation, int luminance)

Tints the character on the screen to (RED, GREEN, BLUE) with SATURATION percent saturation.

This function applies a tint to a specific character. For the meaning of all the parameters, see SetAmbientTint.

The tint set by this function overrides any ambient tint set for the room. For this reason, passing the SATURATION as 0 to this function does not turn it off - rather, it ensures that no tint is applied to the character (even if an ambient tint is set).

To remove the tint set by this function and return to using the ambient tint for this character, call RemoveTint.

NOTE: This function only works in hi-color games and with hi-color sprites.

Example:

cEgo.Tint(0, 250, 0, 30, 100);

will tint the EGO character green.

See Also: Character.HasExplicitTint, Character.RemoveTint, SetAmbientTint


Character.TintBlue

readonly int Character.TintBlue

Gets the Blue setting for the character's current tint.

This property is read-only; to change it, use the Character.Tint command.

NOTE: If the Character.HasExplicitTint property is false, then this value is meaningless.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

See Also: Character.Tint, Character.HasExplicitTint, Character.TintGreen, Character.TintRed, Character.TintLuminance


Character.TintGreen

readonly int Character.TintGreen

Gets the Green setting for the character's current tint.

This property is read-only; to change it, use the Character.Tint command.

NOTE: If the Character.HasExplicitTint property is false, then this value is meaningless.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

See Also: Character.Tint, Character.TintBlue, Character.TintRed, Character.TintSaturation, Character.TintLuminance


Character.TintRed

readonly int Character.TintRed

Gets the Red setting for the character's current tint.

This property is read-only; to change it, use the Character.Tint command.

NOTE: If the Character.HasExplicitTint property is false, then this value is meaningless.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

See Also: Character.Tint, Character.TintBlue, Character.TintGreen, Character.TintSaturation, Character.TintLuminance


Character.TintSaturation

readonly int Character.TintSaturation

Gets the saturation setting for the character's current tint.

This property is read-only; to change it, use the Character.Tint command.

NOTE: If the Character.HasExplicitTint property is false, then this value is meaningless.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

See Also: Character.Tint, Character.TintBlue, Character.TintGreen, Character.TintRed, Character.TintLuminance


Character.TintLuminance

readonly int Character.TintLuminance

Gets the luminance setting for the character's current tint.

This property is read-only; to change it, use the Character.Tint command.

NOTE: If the Character.HasExplicitTint property is false, then this value is meaningless.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

See Also: Character.Tint, Character.TintBlue, Character.TintGreen, Character.TintRed, Character.TintSaturation


Character.UnlockView

(Formerly known as ReleaseCharacterView, which is now obsolete)

Character.UnlockView(StopMovementStyle=eStopMoving)

Allows the engine to automatically control the character's view, as normal. Use this once you have finished doing the animation which you started with the LockView command.

StopMovementStyle determines what to do if character was moving when this function is called. You can pass either eStopMoving (in which case the walking character will stop), or eKeepMoving (in which case the character will keep moving). The default is eStopMoving.

Example:

cEgo.LockView(12);
cEgo.Animate(0, 0, eOnce, eBlock, eForwards);
cEgo.UnlockView();

will play an animation using loop 0 of view 12, then return the character to its normal view.

Compatibility: Optional StopMovementStyle parameter is supported only by AGS 3.4.1 and later versions.

See Also: Character.LockView


Character.Walk

(Formerly known as MoveCharacter, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as MoveCharacterBlocking, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as MoveCharacterDirect, which is now obsolete)

Character.Walk(int x, int y, optional BlockingStyle,
                             optional WalkWhere);

Starts the character moving from its current location to (X,Y), whilst playing his walking animation.

If blocking is eNoBlock (the default) then control returns to the script immediately, and the character will move in the background.

If blocking is eBlock then this command will wait for the character to finish moving before your script resumes.

If walkWhere is eWalkableAreas (the default), then the character will attempt to get as close a possible to (X,Y) by using the room's walkable areas.

If walkWhere is eAnywhere, then the character will simply walk directly from its current location to (X,Y), ignoring the room walkable areas.

If you don't want the character's walking animation to play, you can use the Move command instead.

NOTE: this function only works with characters which are on the current screen.

NOTE: if you need to find out when the character has reached its destination, use the Moving property.

Example:

cEgo.Walk(155, 122, eBlock);

will make the character walk to 155,122. The script will not continue until the character has reached his destination.

See Also: Character.AddWaypoint, Character.FaceCharacter, Character.Move, MoveCharacterToObject, Object.Move, Character.StopMoving


Character.WalkStraight

(Formerly known as MoveCharacterStraight, which is now obsolete)

Character.WalkStraight(int x, int y, optional BlockingStyle);

Moves the character from its current location towards (X,Y) in a straight line as far as is possible before hitting a non-walkable area. This is useful for use with the arrow keys for character movement, since it guarantees that the character will move in a straight line in the direction specified.

blocking determines whether the function waits for the character to finish moving before your script resumes. eNoBlock is the default (which means your script resumes straight away, and the character moves in the background). You can also pass eBlock, in which case your script will not resume until the character finishes moving.

Example:

cEgo.WalkStraight(166, 78);

will move the character EGO in a straight line towards co ordinates 166,78 until he hits a non walkable area.

See Also: Character.Walk


Character.ActiveInventory

(Formerly known as SetActiveInventory, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as character[].activeinv, which is now obsolete)

InventoryItem* Character.ActiveInventory

Gets/sets the character's current active inventory item. Setting it will update the mouse cursor if appropriate.

This property is useful in "Use inventory on hotspot/character/etc" events, to find out which inventory item the player is trying to use on the target.

To deselect the current inventory, set it to null.

Example:

cEgo.ActiveInventory = iKey;

will make the inventory item iKey active (before you use it make sure that the player has the inventory item)


Character.Animating

(Formerly known as character[].animating, which is now obsolete)

readonly bool Character.Animating

Returns 1 if the character is currently animating.
Returns 0 if the character has finished its animation.

This property is read-only. To change character animation, use the Animate command.

Example:

cEgo.Animate(5, 0);
while (cEgo.Animating) Wait(1);

will animate EGO and wait until the animation finishes.

In reality, you would simply use the Blocking parameter of Animate so you wouldn't need to do this.

See Also: Character.Animate, Character.Moving, Character.Speaking, Character.Thinking


Character.AnimationSpeed

(Formerly known as character[].animspeed, which is now obsolete)

int Character.AnimationSpeed;

Gets/sets the character's animation delay, as set in the editor.

Example:

player.AnimationSpeed = 4;

will change the player character's animation speed to 4.

See Also: Character.SetWalkSpeed, Character.SpeechAnimationDelay


Character.Baseline

(Formerly known as SetCharacterBaseline, which is now obsolete)

int Character.Baseline

Gets/sets the character's baseline. This allows you to set a specific base line for the character, which works similarly to walk-behind area and object baselines.

The baseline can be from 1 to the height of the room (normally 200), or set it to 0 to go back to using the character's feet as the baseline.

Example:

cEgo.Baseline = 120;

will move the character's baseline (which can be used for testing collisions, or for walk-behinds) to a line positioned at y coordinate = 120.

See Also: Object.Baseline, SetWalkBehindBase


Character.BlinkInterval

(Formerly part of SetCharacterBlinkView, which is now obsolete)

int Character.BlinkInterval

Gets/sets the character's blinking interval, which specifies how long the game waits between playing the blinking animation. This is specified in game loops - an interval of 80 would play the blinking animation about every 2 seconds.

This property has no effect if no BlinkView has been set.

Example:

cEgo.BlinkView = 10;
cEgo.BlinkInterval = 160;

will change the character EGO's blink view to view 10, and play the animation every 4 seconds.

See Also: Character.BlinkView, Character.SpeechView


Character.BlinkView

(Formerly part of SetCharacterBlinkView, which is now obsolete)

int Character.BlinkView

Gets/sets the character's blinking view. To stop the character from blinking, set this to -1.

The BlinkInterval property sets how often the blinking animation is played.

Example:

cEgo.BlinkView = 10;
cEgo.BlinkInterval = 160;

will change the character EGO's blink view to view 10, and play the animation every 4 seconds.

See Also: Character.BlinkInterval, Character.SpeechView


Character.BlinkWhileThinking

bool Character.BlinkWhileThinking

Gets/sets whether the character can blink while thinking. By default this is set to true, but if your blinking animation only goes with the talking animation and not the thinking one, you can stop the character from blinking while Thinking by setting this to false.

Example:

cEgo.BlinkWhileThinking = false;

will stop EGO from blinking while his thinking animation is playing.

See Also: Character.BlinkView, Character.Think


Character.BlockingHeight

int Character.BlockingHeight

Gets/sets the character's blocking height.

The blocking height determines how large of a blocking rectangle the character exerts to stop other characters walking through it. If this is set to 0 (the default), then the blocking rectangle is automatically calculated to be the character's width, and 5 pixels high.

You can manually change the setting by entering a blocking height in pixels, which is the size of walkable area that the character effectively removes by standing on it.

NOTE: This property has no effect unless the Solid property is set to true.

Example:

cEgo.BlockingHeight = 20;

will make EGO block 20 pixels high (10 above and 10 below his baseline)

See Also: Character.BlockingWidth, Character.Solid


Character.BlockingWidth

int Character.BlockingWidth

Gets/sets the character's blocking width.

The blocking width determines how large of a blocking rectangle the character exerts to stop other characters walking through it. If this is set to 0 (the default), then the blocking rectangle is automatically calculated to be the character's width, and 5 pixels high.

You can manually change the setting by entering a blocking width in pixels, which is the size of walkable area that the character effectively removes by standing on it.

NOTE: This property has no effect unless the Solid property is set to true.

Example:

cEgo.BlockingWidth = 50;

will make EGO block 50 pixels wide (25 pixels to the left of his X co-ordinate, and 25 to the right)

See Also: Character.BlockingHeight, Character.Solid


Character.Clickable

(Formerly known as SetCharacterClickable, which is now obsolete)

bool Character.Clickable

Gets/sets whether the character is recognized as something which the player can interact with. This allows you to modify the "Clickable" property set initially in the Editor.

If you set this to true then the player can look at, speak to, and so on the character (as with the old Sierra games). If you set this to false, then if the player clicks on the character it will activate whatever is behind them (as with the old LucasArts games).

Example:

cMan.Clickable = 0;

will make the game ignore clicks on the character MAN.

See Also: Object.Clickable, Character.Move, Character.Moving, Character.Walk


Character.DestinationX

readonly int Character.DestinationX

Gets the X coordinate of the character's final moving destination. If character is not walking or moving it is equal to its current position.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.0 and later versions.

See Also: Character.DestinationY, Character.Move, Character.Moving, Character.Walk


Character.DestinationY

readonly int Character.DestinationY

Gets the Y coordinate of the character's final moving destination. If character is not walking or moving it is equal to its current position.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.4.0 and later versions.

See Also: Character.DestinationX, Character.Move, Character.Moving, Character.Walk


Character.DiagonalLoops

(Formerly part of SetCharacterProperty, which is now obsolete)

bool Character.DiagonalLoops

Gets/sets whether diagonal walking loops are used for the character. If this is set to true, then loops 4-7 will be used as diagonal walking loops. If this is set to false, then the character will only face in 4 directions and you can use loops 4-7 for other purposes.

Example:

cEgo.DiagonalLoops = true;

will enable diagonal walking loops for character EGO.


Character.Frame

(Formerly known as character[].frame, which is now obsolete)

int Character.Frame

Gets/sets the character's current frame number. Usually you won't change this directly, but will use the Animate command to play an animation.

Example:

Display("EGO currently using frame %d.", cEgo.Frame);

displays EGO's current frame number within his view.

SeeAlso: Character.Animate, Character.Loop, Character.View


Character.HasExplicitTint

readonly bool Character.HasExplicitTint

Returns true if the character has a tint set explicitly with the Character.Tint command.

Returns false if the character has no explicit tint, but it may still be tinted by SetAmbientTint or a region tint.

Example:

if (player.HasExplicitTint)
{
  player.RemoveTint();
}

removes the player's tint if it currently has one.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.1.0 and later versions.

SeeAlso: Character.Tint, Character.RemoveTint


Character.ID

readonly int Character.ID

Gets the character's ID number. This is the character's number from the editor, and is useful if you need to interoperate with legacy code that uses the character's number rather than name.

Example:

MoveCharacter(cEgo.ID, 100, 50);

uses the obsolete MoveCharacter function to move EGO to (100, 50)


Character.IdleView

readonly int Character.IdleView

Gets the character's current idle view. If the character doesn't have one, returns -1.

This property is read-only; to change the view, use the SetIdleView function.

Example:

Display("EGO's idle view is currently view %d.", cEgo.IdleView);

will display EGO's current idle view number.

SeeAlso: SetIdleView


Character.IgnoreLighting

(Formerly known as SetCharacterIgnoreLight, which is now obsolete)

bool Character.IgnoreLighting

Allows you to dynamically modify the "ignore lighting" checkbox for the character. If this is set to 0, the character will be affected by region light levels and tints; if this is set to 1, then the character will ignore all region lighting.

Example:

cEgo.IgnoreLighting = 1;

will make the character look the same no matter if he stands on regions with different light levels.


Character.IgnoreWalkbehinds

This property is obsolete since AGS 3.5.0 and not recommended for use at all.

(Formerly known as SetCharacterIgnoreWalkbehinds, which is now obsolete)

bool Character.IgnoreWalkbehinds

Gets/sets whether the character is affected by walkbehind areas. Passing false (the default setting) means that the character will be placed behind walk- behind areas according to the relevant baselines.

Passing true means that the character will never be placed behind a walk-behind area. This is useful if for example you want to use the character as an overlay to display rain or snow onto a scene.

IMPORTANT: This property is a "dirty hack" and not recommended for use at all. It breaks the logic of drawing order for room elements, and only works as intended if your game is run using Software graphics driver. We strongly suggest to design your rooms without it and rely on Baseline property instead.


Character.InventoryQuantity

(Formerly known as character[].inv, which is now obsolete)

int Character.InventoryQuantity[]

Gets/sets the quantity of the specified inventory item that the character currently has. The array index is the inventory item number, from the Inventory pane in the editor.

Usually, you should use the AddInventory and LoseInventory functions to modify the character's inventory; however, if you need to add or remove a large number of items in one go, directly changing this array can be an easier method.

If you change this array directly, the on-screen inventory will not be updated. In this case, you must call UpdateInventory to see any new or removed items.

If you just want to quickly check whether the character has a particular item or not, use the HasInventory function instead.

Example:

Display("The player has $%d.", player.InventoryQuantity[iCash.ID]);

will display how many inventory items of type iCash the player has.

See Also: UpdateInventory, Character.AddInventory, Character.HasInventory, Character.LoseInventory


Character.Loop

(Formerly known as character[].loop, which is now obsolete)

int Character.Loop

Gets/sets the character's current loop number. Usually you won't change this directly, but will use the Animate command to play an animation.

Example:

Display("EGO currently using loop %d.", cEgo.Loop);

displays EGO's current loop number within his view.

SeeAlso: Character.Animate, Character.Frame, Character.View


Character.ManualScaling

(Formerly known as Character.IgnoreScaling, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly part of SetCharacterProperty, which is now obsolete)

bool Character.ManualScaling

Gets/sets whether the character's scaling level is determined by the walkable area that he is walking on, or whether it is set manually by the script. This is equivalent to the "Ignore room area scaling" checkbox in the editor.

If this is set to true, then the character's scaling level is set manually by the Scaling property (by default this is 100%). If it is set to false, then the character will be stretched or shrunk automatically as appropriate on walkable areas.

Example:

cEgo.ManualScaling = true;
cEgo.Scaling = 50;

will tell EGO to ignore walkable area scaling levels and be fixed to 50% zoom level.

SeeAlso: Character.Scaling


Character.MovementLinkedToAnimation

bool Character.MovementLinkedToAnimation

Gets/sets whether the character's movement is linked to their animation. By default this is true, which means that when the character is walking their movement across the screen will be kept in sync with their animation frame changing. Without this, the character can appear to "glide" across the screen.

In some special cases you may wish to turn this off though, and to do so you can set this property to false.

In previous versions of AGS, this setting was known as "Anti-glide mode" and was a game-wide setting.

Example:

player.MovementLinkedToAnimation = false;
player.Walk(50, 100, eBlock);
player.MovementLinkedToAnimation = true;

will turn off movement-linked animation for the player character, walk him to (50,100), then turn it back on again.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.1.1 and later versions.

See Also: Character.Move, Character.Moving, Character.Walk


Character.Moving

(Formerly known as character[].walking, which is now obsolete)

readonly bool Character.Moving

Returns true if the character is currently moving, or false if not.

This property is read-only; to change the character's movement, use the Walk, Move and StopMoving commands.

Example:

cEgo.Walk(125, 40);
while (cEgo.Moving) Wait(1);

will move EGO to 125,40 and return control to the player when he gets there.

See Also: Character.Animating, Character.Move, Character.Speaking, Character.StopMoving, Character.Thinking, Character.Walk


Character.Name

(Formerly known as character[].name, which is now obsolete)

String Character.Name

Gets/sets the name of the character, as set in the AGS Editor. This is the full name, not the script name.

Note that character names are limited to 40 characters, so if you set the name it will be truncated to that length.

Example:

Display("You are controlling %s.", player.Name);

will display the name of the player character


Character.NormalView

(Formerly known as character[].defview, which is now obsolete)

readonly int Character.NormalView

Gets the character's normal view. This is the character's standard walking view, that is used when his view is not locked to something else.

This property is read-only; to change it, use the ChangeView command.

Example:

if (cEgo.View == cEgo.NormalView) {
  Display("EGO is not animating, not talking and not idle.");
}

will display a message if EGO is currently displayed using his normal view.

See Also: Character.ChangeView, Character.View


Character.PreviousRoom

(Formerly known as character[].prevroom, which is now obsolete)

readonly int Character.PreviousRoom

Gets the room number that the character was previously in. If the character is still in the room that they started in, this will be -1. Otherwise, it will be the room number of the room that they were last in.

This is a read-only property. It is set automatically by ChangeRoom.

Example:

Display("EGO's previous room was %d.", cEgo.PreviousRoom);

will display the EGO character's previous room.


Character.Room

(Formerly known as character[].room, which is now obsolete)

readonly int Character.Room

Gets the room number that the character is currently in.

This is a read-only property. It is set by ChangeRoom.

Example:

Display("EGO is in room %d.", cEgo.Room);

will display the EGO character's current room.


Character.ScaleMoveSpeed

(Formerly part of SetCharacterProperty, which is now obsolete)

bool Character.ScaleMoveSpeed

Gets/sets whether the character's movement speed is adjusted in line with his current scaling level. This allows you to modify the "Adjust speed with scaling" option from the editor.

If you set this to true, the character's movement speed will be adjusted so that he walks at a speed relative to his current scaling level. If you set this to false, the character will always just move at his normal speed.

Example:

cEgo.ScaleMoveSpeed = true;

will mean that EGO's speed is adjusted in line with his scaling

See Also: Character.ScaleVolume


Character.ScaleVolume

bool Character.ScaleVolume

Gets/sets whether the character's volume is adjusted in line with his current scaling level. This allows you to modify the "Adjust volume with scaling" option from the editor.

By default, this is false. If you set it to true, then any frame-linked sounds for the character (for example, footstep sounds) will have their volume automatically adjusted in line with the character's scaling level. At the normal 100% zoom level the sounds will be played at normal volume, but will then get quieter and louder as appropriate in scaled walkable areas.

Example:

cEgo.ScaleVolume = true;

will mean that EGO's footstep sounds are adjusted in line with his scaling

See Also: Character.ScaleMoveSpeed


Character.Scaling

int Character.Scaling

Gets/sets the character's current scaling level.

This property can always be read, and returns the character's current zoom level, which will be between 5 and 200 (the default being 100 if they are not currently scaled).

You can only set the value of this property if ManualScaling is enabled for the character; otherwise, the scaling is determined automatically based on the walkable area that the character is on.

Example:

cEgo.ManualScaling = true;
cEgo.Scaling = 50;

will tell EGO to ignore walkable area scaling levels and be fixed to 50% zoom level.

SeeAlso: Character.ManualScaling


Character.Solid

(Formerly part of SetCharacterProperty, which is now obsolete)

bool Character.Solid

Gets/sets whether the character can be walked through by other characters.

If this is set to true, then the character is solid and will block the path of other characters. If this is set to false, then the character acts like a hologram, and other characters can walk straight through him.

Example:

cEgo.Solid = true;

will mean that EGO blocks the path other characters.

See Also: Character.BlockingHeight, Character.BlockingWidth


Character.Speaking

readonly bool Character.Speaking

Returns true if the character is currently talking, or false if not.

This property is read-only. It will only return true for the active talking character; that is, it will not return true for any characters talking with the SayBackground command.

Since this property will only be true while the character is speaking, and speaking is a blocking command, this property will probably only be useful to access from the repeatedly_execute_always or late_repeatedly_execute_always handlers.

Example:

if ((cEgo.Speaking) && (!cEgo.Animating)) {
  cEgo.Animate(3, 5, eRepeat, eNoBlock);
}

will animate the character using loop 3 while they are talking (only useful with Sierra-style speech).

See Also: Character.Animating, Character.Moving, Character.Say, Character.SpeakingFrame, Character.Thinking


Character.SpeakingFrame

readonly int Character.SpeakingFrame

Returns the current frame number of the character's talking animation. This is useful when using Sierra-style speech, if you want to synchronize events with the progress of the close-up face talking animation.

This property is read-only. It is only accessible while the character is speaking; if you attempt to call it when Character.Speaking is false then it will raise an error.

Since speaking is a blocking command, this property will probably only be useful access from the repeatedly_execute_always or late_repeatedly_execute_always handlers.

Example:

if (cEgo.Speaking) {
  if (cEgo.SpeakingFrame == 0) {
    cMan.Move(cMan.x + 10, cMan.y, eNoBlock, eAnywhere);
  }
}

will move cMan to the right every time the talking animation loops back to Frame 0.

See Also: Character.Say, Character.Speaking


Character.SpeechAnimationDelay

int Character.SpeechAnimationDelay;

Gets/sets the character's speech animation delay, as set in the editor. This specifies how many game loops each frame of the character's speech animation is shown for.

NOTE: This property is ignored if lip sync is enabled.

NOTE: This property cannot be used if the Speech.UseGlobalSpeechAnimationDelay is set to true. In that case, the Speech.GlobalSpeechAnimationDelay property value is used instead.

Example:

player.SpeechAnimationDelay = 4;

will change the player character's speech animation speed to 4.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.1.2 and later versions.

See Also: Character.AnimationSpeed, Character.SpeechView, Game.TextReadingSpeed, Speech.GlobalSpeechAnimationDelay, Speech.UseGlobalSpeechAnimationDelay,


Character.SpeechColor

(Formerly known as SetTalkingColor, which is now obsolete)

int Character.SpeechColor

Gets/sets the character's speech text color. This is set by default in the editor.

NEWCOLOR is the color slot index from the Palette Editor. This can be 0-255 for a 256-color game, or one of the hi-color indexes available from the Palette Editor.

Example:

cEgo.SpeechColor = 14;

will change the character's EGO talking color to yellow.

See Also: Character.SpeechView


Character.SpeechView

(Formerly known as SetCharacterSpeechView, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as character[].talkview, which is now obsolete)

int Character.SpeechView

Gets/sets the character's talking view. If you change it, the new view number will be used as the character's talking view in all future conversations.

You can set this to -1 to disable the character's speech view.

Example:

cEgo.SpeechView = 10;

will change the character EGO's speech view to view 10.

See Also: Character.ChangeView, Character.BlinkView, Character.SpeechAnimationDelay, Character.SpeechColor


Character.Thinking

readonly bool Character.Thinking

Returns true if the character is currently thinking, or false if not.

This property is read-only. It will only return true for the active thinking character.

Since this property will only be true while the character is thinking, and thinking is a blocking command, this property will probably only be useful to access from the repeatedly_execute_always or late_repeatedly_execute_always handlers.

Example:

function repeatedly_execute_always()
{
  if (cEgo.Thinking) {
    cEgo.Transparency = 50;
  else
    cEgo.Transparency = 0;
}

this will keep character semi-transparent while he is thinking.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.3.4 and later versions.

See Also: Character.Animating, Character.Moving, Character.Speaking Character.Think, Character.ThinkingFrame,


Character.ThinkingFrame

readonly int Character.ThinkingFrame

Returns the current frame number of the character's thinking animation. This is useful when using Sierra-style speech, if you want to synchronize events with the progress of the close-up face talking animation.

This property is read-only. It is only accessible while the character is thinking; if you attempt to call it when Character.Thinking is false then it will raise an error.

Since thinking is a blocking command, this property will probably only be useful access from the repeatedly_execute_always or late_repeatedly_execute_always handlers.

Example:

if (cEgo.Thinking) {
  if (cEgo.ThinkingFrame == 0) {
    cMan.Move(cMan.x + 10, cMan.y, eNoBlock, eAnywhere);
  }
}

will move cMan to the right every time the thinking animation loops back to Frame 0.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.3.4 and later versions.

See Also: Character.Think, Character.Thinking


Character.ThinkView

(Formerly known as character[].thinkview, which is now obsolete)

int Character.ThinkView

Gets/sets the character's thinking view. This is used to animate the character when a thought is being displayed.

Example:

cEgo.ThinkView = 14;

will change the character EGO's thinking view to 14.

See Also: Character.Think


Character.Transparency

(Formerly known as SetCharacterTransparency, which is now obsolete)

int Character.Transparency

Gets/sets the character's transparency. This is specified as a percentage, from 0 to 100. 100 means fully transparent (i.e. invisible), and 0 is totally opaque (fully visible). Numbers in between represent varying levels of transparency.

NOTE: Transparency only works in 16-bit and 32-bit color games.

NOTE: When using the DirectX 5 driver, a large transparent character can significantly slow down AGS.

Some rounding is done internally when the transparency is stored -- therefore, if you get the transparency after setting it, the value you get back might be one out. Therefore, using a loop with cEgo.Transparency++; is not recommended as it will probably end too quickly.

In order to fade a character in, the best approach is shown in the example below:

Example:

int trans = cEgo.Transparency;
while (trans < 100) {
  trans++;
  cEgo.Transparency = trans;
  Wait(1);
}

will gradually fade out the character from its current transparency level to being fully invisible.

See Also: Object.Transparency


Character.TurnBeforeWalking

(Formerly part of SetCharacterProperty, which is now obsolete)

bool Character.TurnBeforeWalking

Gets/sets whether the character turns to face his new direction before walking. This is equivalent (though opposite) to the editor "Do not turn before walking" tick-box.

If you set this to 1, the character will turn on the spot to face his new direction before setting off on a walk. If you set this to 0, the character will instantly face in the correct direction and start walking.

Example:

cEgo.TurnBeforeWalking = 1;

will tell EGO to turn to face his new direction before setting off, whenever he walks.


Character.View

readonly int Character.View

Gets the view that the character is currently displayed using.

This property is read-only; to change the view, use the ChangeView and LockView functions.

Example:

Display("EGO's view is currently view %d.", cEgo.View);

will display EGO's current view number.

SeeAlso: Character.ChangeView, Character.Frame, Character.LockView, Character.Loop, Character.NormalView


Character.WalkSpeedX

readonly int Character.WalkSpeedX;

Gets the character's walking speed in the X direction. If using uniform movement, this will be the same as the Y walking speed.

This property is read-only. To change the walking speed, use the SetWalkSpeed function.

Example:

Display("player's x speed: %d", player.WalkSpeedX);

will display the player's X speed.

See Also: Character.SetWalkSpeed, Character.WalkSpeedY


Character.WalkSpeedY

readonly int Character.WalkSpeedY;

Gets the character's walking speed in the Y direction. If using uniform movement, this will be the same as the X walking speed.

This property is read-only. To change the walking speed, use the SetWalkSpeed function.

Example:

Display("player's y speed: %d", player.WalkSpeedY);

will display the player's Y speed.

See Also: Character.SetWalkSpeed, Character.WalkSpeedX


Character.x

int Character.x;

Gets/sets the character's current X co-ordinate. This is expressed in normal room co-ordinates, and specifies the bottom-center of the character's sprite.

NOTE: Do NOT change this property while the character is moving. Make sure the character is standing still before changing his co-ordinates.

Example:

Display("The player is at %d,%d.", player.x, player.y);

displays the player character's current coordinates.

See Also: Character.y, Character.z


Character.y

int Character.y;

Gets/sets the character's current Y co-ordinate. This is expressed in normal room co-ordinates, and specifies the bottom-center of the character's sprite.

NOTE: Do NOT change this property while the character is moving. Make sure the character is standing still before changing his co-ordinates.

Example:

Display("The player is at %d,%d.", player.x, player.y);

displays the player character's current coordinates.

See Also: Character.x, Character.z


Character.z

int Character.z;

Gets/sets the character's current Z position. This allows the character to levitate off the ground, whilst still retaining its normal Y co-ordinate for baseline calculations and regions.

Normally this is set to 0 (ground-level), but you can increase it to make the character float.

Example:

while (player.z < 20) {
  player.z++;
  Wait(1);
}

gradually levitates the character up to 20 pixels.

See Also: Character.x, Character.y