DrawingSurface functions and properties

The DrawingSurface family of functions allow you to directly draw onto dynamic sprites and room backgrounds in the game. You get a drawing surface by calling DynamicSprite.GetDrawingSurface or Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground, and you can then use the following methods to draw onto the surface.

IMPORTANT: You MUST call the Release method when you have finished drawing onto the surface. This allows AGS to update its cached copies of the image and upload it to video memory if appropriate.


DrawingSurface.Clear

(Formerly known as RawClearScreen, which is now obsolete)

DrawingSurface.Clear(optional int color)

Clears the surface to the specified COLOR (this is a number you can find in the Colors pane of the editor). The current contents of the surface will be lost.

If you do not supply the COLOR parameter, or use COLOR_TRANSPARENT, the surface will be cleared to be fully transparent.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.Clear(14);
surface.DrawingColor = 13;
surface.DrawCircle(160,100,50);
surface.Release();

clears the room background to be fully yellow, then draws a pink circle in the middle of it.

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawingColor


DrawingSurface.CreateCopy

(Formerly known as RawSaveScreen, which is now obsolete)

DrawingSurface* DrawingSurface.CreateCopy()

Makes a backup copy of the current surface, in order that it can be restored later. This could be useful to back up a background scene before writing over it, or to save a certain state of your drawing to restore later.

Unlike the obsolete RawSaveScreen command in previous versions of AGS, backup surfaces created with this command are not lost when the player changes room or restores a game. However, surfaces containing a copy of room backgrounds can be very large, using up a large amount of memory and can increase the save game sizes significantly. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that you Release any backup copy surfaces as soon as you are done with them.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
DrawingSurface *backup = surface.CreateCopy();
surface.DrawTriangle(0,0,160,100,0,200);
Wait(80);
surface.DrawSurface(backup);
backup.Release();
surface.Release();

will save a copy of the room background, draw a triangle onto it, wait for a while and then restore the original background.

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawSurface


DrawingSurface.DrawCircle

(Formerly known as RawDrawCircle, which is now obsolete)

DrawingSurface.DrawCircle(int x, int y, int radius)

Draws a filled circle of radius RADIUS with its center at (X,Y) in the current drawing color.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.DrawingColor = 14;
surface.DrawCircle(160,100,50);
surface.Release();

will draw a circle in the center of the screen, of 50 pixels radius.

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawLine, DrawingSurface.DrawingColor


DrawingSurface.DrawImage

(Formerly known as RawDrawImage, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as RawDrawImageResized, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as RawDrawImageTransparent, which is now obsolete)

DrawingSurface.DrawImage(int x, int y, int slot, optional int transparency,
                         optional int width, optional int height)

Draws image SLOT from the sprite manager onto the surface at location (X,Y).

Optionally, you can also specify the transparency of the image. This is a number from 0-100; using a transparency of 50 will draw the image semi-transparent; using 0 means it will not be transparent.

You can also resize the image as you draw it. In order to do this, simply specify a width and height that you wish to resize the image to when it is drawn.

NOTE: This command only works if the image to be drawn is the same color depth as the surface that you are drawing onto.

NOTE: Transparency does not work in 256-color games, or with 256-color sprites.

NOTE: The X and Y co-ordinates given are ROOM co-ordinates, not SCREEN co-ordinates. This means that in a scrolling room you can draw outside the current visible area.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.DrawImage(100, 100, oDoor.Graphic, 40);
surface.Release();

will draw the oDoor object's graphic onto the room background at (100, 100), at 40% transparency.

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawLine, DrawingSurface.DrawString, DrawingSurface.DrawSurface, Room.ColorDepth


DrawingSurface.DrawLine

(Formerly known as RawDrawLine, which is now obsolete)

DrawingSurface.DrawLine(int from_x, int from_y, int to_x, int to_y,
                        optional int thickness)

Draws a line from (FROM_X, FROM_Y) to (TO_X, TO_Y) in the surface's current drawing color.

The thickness parameter allows you to specify how thick the line is, the default being 1 pixel.

NOTE: The X and Y co-ordinates given are ROOM co-ordinates, not SCREEN co-ordinates. This means that in a scrolling room you can draw outside the current visible area.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.DrawingColor = 14;
surface.DrawLine(0, 0, 160, 100);
surface.Release();

will draw a line from the left top of the screen (0,0) to the middle of the screen (160,100);

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawCircle, DrawingSurface.DrawRectangle, DrawingSurface.DrawTriangle, DrawingSurface.DrawingColor


DrawingSurface.DrawMessageWrapped

(Formerly known as RawPrintMessageWrapped, which is now obsolete)

DrawingSurface.DrawMessageWrapped(int x, int y, int width,
                                  FontType font, int message_number)

Draws the room message MESSAGE_NUMBER onto the surface at (x,y), using the specified FONT.

WIDTH is the width of the virtual textbox enclosing the text, and is the point that the text will wrap at. This command is designed for writing a long message to the screen with it wrapping normally like a standard label would do.

The text will be printed using the current drawing color.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.DrawingColor = 14;
surface.DrawMessageWrapped(80, 40, 160, Game.NormalFont, 10);
surface.Release();

will display message 10 in the center of the screen, starting from Y = 40.

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawString, DrawingSurface.DrawingColor, DrawingSurface.DrawStringWrapped


DrawingSurface.DrawPixel

DrawingSurface.DrawPixel(int x, int y)

Draws a single pixel onto the surface at (X,Y) in the current color. The pixel thickness respects the UseHighResCoordinates property.

NOTE: This command is not fast enough to use repeatedly to build up an image. Only use it for single pixel adjustments.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.DrawingColor = 14;
surface.DrawPixel(50, 50);
surface.Release();

draws a yellow pixel in the top left of the room background

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawingColor, DrawingSurface.DrawLine, DrawingSurface.GetPixel, DrawingSurface.UseHighResCoordinates


DrawingSurface.DrawRectangle

(Formerly known as RawDrawRectangle, which is now obsolete)

DrawingSurface.DrawRectangle(int x1, int y1, int x2, int y2)

Draws a filled rectangle in the current color with its top-left corner at (x1,y1) and its bottom right corner at (x2, y2)

NOTE: The X and Y co-ordinates given are ROOM co-ordinates, not SCREEN co-ordinates. This means that in a scrolling room you can draw outside the current visible area.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.DrawingColor = 14;
surface.DrawRectangle(0, 0, 160, 100);
surface.Release();

will draw a rectangle over the top left hand quarter of the screen.

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawImage, DrawingSurface.DrawLine


DrawingSurface.DrawString

(Formerly known as RawPrint, which is now obsolete)

DrawingSurface.DrawString(int x, int y, FontType font, string text, ...)

Draws the text onto the surface at (x, y), using the supplied font number. The text will be drawn in the current drawing color.

You can insert the value of variables into the message. For more information, see the string formatting section.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.DrawingColor = 14;
surface.DrawString(0, 100, Game.NormalFont, "Text written into the background!");
surface.Release();

will write some text onto the middle-left of the room background

See Also: GetTextWidth, DrawingSurface.DrawStringWrapped, DrawingSurface.DrawingColor


DrawingSurface.DrawStringWrapped

DrawingSurface.DrawStringWrapped(int x, int y, int width,
                                 FontType font, Alignment,
                                 const string text)

Draws the text onto the surface at (x,y), using the specified FONT.

width is the width of the virtual textbox enclosing the text, and is the point that the text will wrap at. You can use the alignment parameter to determine how the text is horizontally aligned.

The text will be printed using the current drawing color.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.DrawingColor = 14;
surface.DrawStringWrapped(80, 40, 160, Game.NormalFont, eAlignCentre, "Hello, my name is Bob.");
surface.Release();

will display the text in the center of the screen, starting from Y = 40.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.0.1 and later versions.

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawString, DrawingSurface.DrawingColor, DrawingSurface.DrawMessageWrapped


DrawingSurface.DrawSurface

(Formerly known as RawDrawFrameTransparent, which is now obsolete)
(Formerly known as RawRestoreScreen, which is now obsolete)

DrawingSurface.DrawSurface(DrawingSurface *source, optional int transparency)

Draws the specified surface on top of this surface, optionally using transparency percent transparency.

This allows you to perform day-to-night fading and other special effects.

NOTE: You cannot use the transparency parameter with 256-color surfaces.

NOTE: This command can be a bit on the slow side, so don't call it from repeatedly_execute.

TIP: If you want to gradually fade in a second background, create a copy of the original surface and then restore it after each iteration, otherwise the backgrounds will converge too quickly.

Example:

DrawingSurface *mainBackground = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground(0);
DrawingSurface *nightBackground = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground(1);
mainBackground.DrawSurface(nightBackground, 50);
mainBackground.Release();
nightBackground.Release();

this will draw background frame 1 onto frame 0 at 50% opacity.

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawImage, SetAmbientTint


DrawingSurface.DrawTriangle

(Formerly known as RawDrawTriangle, which is now obsolete)

DrawingSurface.DrawTriangle(int x1, int y1, int x2, int y2, int x3, int y3)

Draws a filled triangle in the current color with corners at the points (x1,y1), (x2,y2) and (x3,y3).

Well, don't look at me, you might find it useful for something :-)

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.DrawingColor = 14;
surface.DrawTriangle(0,0,160,100,0,200);
surface.Release();

will draw a triangle with corners at the points (0,0),(160,100),(0,200).

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawImage, DrawingSurface.DrawLine, DrawingSurface.DrawRectangle


DrawingSurface.Release

DrawingSurface.Release()

Tells AGS that you have finished drawing onto this surface, and that AGS can now upload the changed image into video memory.

After calling this method, you can no longer use the DrawingSurface instance. To do any further drawing, you need to get the surface again.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.DrawingColor = 14;
surface.DrawLine(0, 0, 50, 50);
surface.Release();

draws a yellow diagonal line across the top-left of the current room background, then releases the image.

See Also: DynamicSprite.GetDrawingSurface, Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground


DrawingSurface.DrawingColor

(Formerly known as RawSetColor, which is now obsolete)

int DrawingSurface.DrawingColor

Gets/sets the current drawing color on this surface. Set this before using commands like DrawLine, which use this color for their drawing.

You can set this either to an AGS Color Number (as you'd get from the Colors pane in the editor) or to the special constant COLOR_TRANSPARENT, which allows you to draw transparent areas onto the surface.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
surface.DrawingColor = 14;
surface.DrawLine(0, 0, 160, 100);
surface.DrawingColor = Game.GetColorFromRGB(255, 255, 255);
surface.DrawLine(0, 199, 160, 100);
surface.Release();

will draw a yellow line from the left top of the screen (0,0) to the middle of the screen (160,100), and a white line from the bottom left to the middle.

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawCircle, DrawingSurface.DrawLine, DrawingSurface.DrawRectangle, Game.GetColorFromRGB


DrawingSurface.GetPixel

int DrawingSurface.GetPixel(int x, int y)

Returns the AGS Color Number of the pixel at (X,Y) on the surface.

NOTE: In high-color games, the first 32 color numbers have a special meaning due to an AGS feature which maintains compatibility with 8-bit games. Therefore, if you draw onto the surface using a blue color number 0-31 you will get a different number when you GetPixel -- and in fact the color drawn may not be what you expect. To get around this, add 1 Red or Green component to adjust the color number out of this range.

NOTE: This command is relatively slow. Don't use it to try and process an entire image.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
Display("The color of the middle pixel is %d.", surface.GetPixel(160, 100));
surface.Release();

displays the pixel color of the center pixel on the screen.

Compatibility: Supported by AGS 3.0.1 and later versions.

See Also: DrawingSurface.DrawingColor, DrawingSurface.DrawPixel, DrawingSurface.UseHighResCoordinates


DrawingSurface.Height

readonly int DrawingSurface.Height

Gets the height of the surface.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
Display("The background is %d x %d!", surface.Width, surface.Height);
surface.Release();

displays the size of the surface to the player

See Also: DrawingSurface.UseHighResCoordinates, DrawingSurface.Width


DrawingSurface.UseHighResCoordinates

This property is obsolete since AGS 3.5.0 and not recommended for use at all.

bool DrawingSurface.UseHighResCoordinates

Gets/sets whether you want to use high-resolution co-ordinates with this surface.

By default, this property will be set such that drawing surface co-ordinates use the same co-ordinate system as the rest of the game, as per the "Use low-res co-ordinates in script" game setting. However, if your game is 640x400 or higher you can customize whether this drawing surface uses native co-ordinates or the low-res 320x200 co-ordinates by changing this property.

Setting this property affects ALL other commands performed on this drawing surface, including the Width and Height properties.

IMPORTANT: This property is a remnant of the old and since deprecated feature in AGS which allowed to treat all coordinates in high-resolution games as if they were for low-resolution. For example: have 640x400 game but use 320x200 measurements in script, which would make each drawing operation to be performed x2 thicker on screen.
Since AGS 3.5.0 this property is ignored unless you have backwards-compatible "Allow relative asset resolutions" option enabled in General Settings.


DrawingSurface.Width

readonly int DrawingSurface.Width

Gets the width of the surface.

Example:

DrawingSurface *surface = Room.GetDrawingSurfaceForBackground();
Display("The background is %d x %d!", surface.Width, surface.Height);
surface.Release();

displays the size of the surface to the player

See Also: DrawingSurface.Height, DrawingSurface.UseHighResCoordinates